For a general introduction to A-ECG, see this Video.

The additional teaching videos below are designed for clinicians and researchers who are already familiar with (know how to read) conventional 12-lead ECGs:

A-ECG results from Full-Disclosure (5-min) 12-lead ECGs:

(1) An introductory video that shows most of our various A-ECG programs "in action", specifically during the replay of a normal, full-disclosure (5+ minute) conventional 12-lead ECG from a healthy patient (Video #1). Viewers should start by viewing Video #1 first, inasmuch as it's important to first understand what "healthy" looks like before then later moving on to A-ECG results from patients with various pathological conditions. 

(2) A second video that shows the same programs in action, but this time during the replay of a "mostly normal" full-disclosure (5+ minute) conventional 12-lead ECG from a patient with diabetes (and atypical chest discomfort) wherein the final A-ECG call was coronary artery disease, consistent with a coronary angiogram that later revealed single-vessel disease with a 90%+ occlusion of the right coronary artery (Video #2). 

(3) A third video that again shows the same programs in action, but this time during the replay of a "non-specifically abnormal", full-disclosure (5+ minute) 12-lead ECG from a patient with shortness of breath. In this case the final A-ECG call was non-ischemic cardiomyopathy (NICM), a condition that was also later verified by echocardiography and other imaging tests (Video #3). 

A-ECG results from "Snapshot" (10-sec) 12-lead ECGs:

(4) A fourth video showing the A-ECG analyses of a 10-sec "snapshot" 12-lead ECG that was read as "clinically normal", but wherein A-ECG analyses called left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), making the A-ECG results more consistent with the patient's ultimate echocardiographic and other imaging results that revealed severe aortic stenosis along with LVH (Video #4). The final written A-ECG Report for this elderly male, who we've named "Tavis Reddy" (a descriptive rather than real name), can also be viewed in the Example A-ECG Reports section of the website.

(5) A fifth video showing the A-ECG analyses of another 10-sec "snapshot" 12-lead ECG from a different patient (a 39-year old male). In this case, the conventional 12-lead ECG was borderline abnormal, showing non-specific T-wave changes in the lateral ECG leads along with borderline Cornell voltage criteria for LVH. However in this case the final A-ECG call was the genetic heart condition hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), consistent with ultimate echocardiographic and other imaging (as well as genetic testing) results. (Video #5). The final written A-ECG Report for this young adult male, who we've named "M.T. Chambers" (a descriptive rather than real name), can also be viewed in the Example A-ECG Reports section of the website. 

(6) A sixth video showing A-ECG analyses of a final 10-sec snapshot 12-lead ECG, this one from a 14-year old boy. This boy had a syncopal episode and transient loss of consciousness, but later revived. His parents brought him for medical attention, at which time his conventional 12-lead ECG was read as normal. However the A-ECG analyses of this same conventional ECG called a long QT syndrome (LQTS), in spite of his "normal" conventional ECG and QTc interval (Video #6). The A-ECG diagnosis was ultimately consistent with results from genetic testing, which revealed a Type 1 genetic LQTS. The final written A-ECG Report for this boy, who we've named "Kent C. Long" (again a descriptive rather than real name), can also be viewed in the Example A-ECG Reports section of the website.  

Determination and display of final A-ECG results:  letting statistical analyses "put it all together":

(7) This is a slightly longer video (12+ minutes) that "puts it all together" by explaining and illustrating the final statistics-based A-ECG results for all patients whose "individual parameter" A-ECG results are discussed in videos 1-6 above.  This video should ideally be viewed only after all six of the above videos have first been viewed. (Video #7).